How to Do Dumbbell Front Raises


front raise

This article is for anyone who wants to know how to front raise. There are many forms of front raises including standing front raises, seated front raises, and even walking front raises. Each technique offers unique benefits that will challenge the lifter differently. Before one can begin learning how to do dumbbell front raises, one needs to understand the mechanics behind the lift.

What are front raises?

A little girl posing for a picture

Front raises is an exercise designed to work out front deltoids also known as anterior deltoid. Front raises work best when using either a bar or dumbbells. Also, front raises can be done sitting or standing but both variations have their advantages and disadvantages which you will find out soon! This workout targets one of three heads of our deltoids; its name is frontalis, also known as the front head.

Front raising works all muscles involved with side flexion including the shoulders, obliques, rhomboids, etc. The lats play an important supporting role throughout front raising exercises because they assist in stabilizing the shoulder blades which helps keep the shoulder joint healthy.

While front raises can be done with a variety of weightlifting equipment, this article will focus on how to do dumbbell front raises. Dumbbell front raises are a great exercise for targeting the front deltoids and help to improve shoulder flexibility and range of motion.

Steps:

A woman holding her hand to her face

The following steps will outline how to properly execute a dumbbell front raise:

Hold a dumbbell in each hand with your palms facing front and your arms fully extended downward.

Maintaining this position, slowly raise the weights out to the front and up to shoulder height while keeping your elbows slightly bent.

Repeat for desired reps.

Hold the dumbbell in front of your thigh with your palm facing down. Engage core and stand tall, feet hip-width apart.

Lift the dumbbell to shoulder height while keeping the elbow locked at a 90-degree angle. Keep core engaged throughout front raise movement. Pause briefly before returning the weight to starting position on the front of the thigh. Return to start position slowly by dropping your elbow back down, then rebend it again until the arm is fully extended out in front of you before moving onto the next rep for one complete front raise movement per rep. Repeat seven reps total twice seven times for each side. Increase resistance if front raises are too easy or decrease resistance if front raises are too difficult by using either lighter or heavier dumbbells.

You can also do front raises seated by sitting upright with a weightlifting bench and placing the weights in front of your thighs with palms facing down as you did before. Keeping core engaged, lift the weights straight up in front of you until they reach shoulder height. Pause at the top of the lift before slowly lowering them back to the starting position. Repeat seven reps total twice seven times for each side.

Another way to do front raises is while standing and holding onto a railing or sturdy post for support with one arm while lifting weight in another arm straight out in front of you to shoulder level.

If you want an added challenge, try doing front raises while holding light dumbbells in front of your thighs with palms facing front and then add front raise movements, you can increase the range of motion by lifting the weights higher or by adding a pause at the top of the lift. You can also increase the intensity of this exercise by using heavier weights.

Precautions:

If you have any shoulder issues, please consult a doctor before attempting front raises. This exercise can aggravate existing shoulder problems if done incorrectly. Start with light weights and work your way up gradually to avoid any unnecessary injuries.

Target muscles:

Front deltoids (anterior head), biceps brachii, brachialis, coracobrachialis.

Equipment needed:

One set of weights or dumbbells, either light enough to lift for front raises (dumbbells) or heavy enough to put on the front raise bar (weights).

Conclusion:

The front raise is a great exercise for targeting the front deltoids and helps to improve shoulder flexibility and range of motion. This will help protect your back and ensure that you are getting the most out of this exercise.

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